Radio Stations Hacked Recently

Radio stations in South Carolina, Indiana, Texas, Tennessee and Kentucky, were hacked recently to broadcast the Bompton-based rapper YG and Nipsey Hussle’s anti-Trump song “F*** Donald Trump,” which was already a radio hit in some parts of the country last year, several sources report.

The song was repeatedly played on Monday night, according to the RadioInsight, and the news of the incident began emerging shortly after Trump’s inauguration on January 20, eight days before hackers hacked 70 percent of the police CCTV cameras in Washington DC.

Hackers gained access to the radio stations by exploiting known vulnerabilities in Barix Exstreamer devices which can decode audio file formats and send them along for LPFM transmission.

Read more in:
http://thehackernews.com/2017/02/radio-station-trump-hack.html

Using big data for security only provides insight, not protection

Cybersecurity experts are excited about big data because it is the “crime scene investigator” of data science. If your organization is hacked and customer information compromised, your use of big data to collect massive amounts of information on your systems, users and customers makes it possible for data analysts to provide insight into what went wrong.

But while big data can help solve the crime after it occurred, it doesn’t help prevent it in the first place. You’re still left cleaning up the mess left behind by the breach: angry customers, possible compliance issues with data privacy standards like HIPAA and PCI DSS, maybe even government fines and class-action lawsuits.

This is where big data fails to meet its big promise: when it is employed after a data breach happens. As the old saying goes, “Hindsight is the best sight.” Big data, when utilized after a cyberattack, certainly gives you that. However, what it doesn’t give you is the ability to realize that a breach is happening, or is about to happen, and stop it before massive damage is done. Because of this, big data, when used in a vacuum, will not secure your systems, your business, or any of your sensitive information.

Read more in:
http://www.networksasia.com: Using big data for security only provides insight, not protection Authority